Live on Indiegogo!

So many of you have probably been wondering what our next move was since we were denied on Kickstarter. Well here’s the answer:


Indiegogo.com is a crowdfunding website very similar to Kickstarter, however they are happy to embrace a much wider scope of projects and have fewer restrictions on what they accept. So with that said, we are very pleased to announce that we are now live and ready to accept contributions!

Check out our campaign HERE. (http://www.indiegogo.com/hydroice)

PLEASE contribute whatever you can and PRETTY PLEASE share what we’re doing with your family and friends. It’s by spreading the word that we’ll be able to make this happen!

Now, on to a more technical update…

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The Team at MSU checked in with me last week. They’ve been very busy collecting data and preparing the design for the thermal solar collectors that the system will utilize. I must say, we’ve been extremely impressed with the work that they’ve done. It’s great having a team to work with who is as passionate about the project as we are.

I’ve also met with the directors of The Center for Emerging Technologies in St. Louis, MO. They specialize in helping new technologies like ours make it off the ground and into the market by providing support in both the labratory and they office. They’re extremely excited about the work that we’ve been doing and we’re definitely looking forward to working with them more in the very near future. It should definitely help us speed along the process of making affordable solar energy to you!

– Matt

Change of plans

It’s been quite a busy week. After going gangbusters the past 2-months to get our Kickstarter campaing rolling, we received some very dissapointing news. We submitted our project to Kickstarter for approval and 3 days later, a message came back notifying us that we had been declined BUT we could submit an appeal and they would reconsider!

The frustrating part about this process is that Kickstarter will NOT go into detail about why they choose to decline various projects. All they’ll say is that the project does not fall within the website’s “focus.” Huh?

As it turns out, merely 3-weeks ago, as we were zeroing in on our final presentation for submission, Kickstarter changed many of their guidelines regarding hardware projects on their site. Rumor also has it that they’ve also removed somewhere in the neighborhood of 14 projects recently due to issues with intellectual property.

It’s difficult to say exactly what all of this means, or how it affected our project (yes, we appealed and were denied again), but our best guess is that they’ve been facing complaints from people who claim that certain projects violate their IP rights.

Kickstarter is still lively with projects that revolve around the arts (movies, music, books, etc.) BUT it appears that any proprietary projects are suffering and slowly being squeezed out of the equation. That’s truly a shame. Advances in hardware/technology is what keeps our civilzation moving forward and is the best shot for providing aid to our sickly economy. But now, yet another powerful tool is being removed from the innovator’s toolbox. It’s an all-too-perfect testament to the social decay that our country is in the midst of.

So what does this mean for our project?

Luckily we don’t have all our eggs in one basket so we’re still moving forward quiclky, I’ll follow this up with another post in the next couple weeks on our latest and greatest developments.

– Matt

John O’Donnell talks about Solar Thermal Energy

Back in 2009, John O’Donnell, former co-founder of Ausra, gave a presentation at Stanford University about solar thermal energy.  In the video, he makes it extremely clear why thermal solar energy, NOT photovoltaics, is where a viable clean energy solution lies.  Much of what he says relates directly to our project so I encourage you to watch and further familiarize yourself with the thermal solar cycle.

At the 47:50 mark of the video, Mr. O’Donnell concludes his presenatation and opens the floor for questions. The very first questions asks what is preventing solar thermal from being scaled down to “rooftop” applications. If you do not listen to any other part of the video, make sure to at least check that segment out. It’s our new technology that finally makes the solar thermal cycle viable for “rooftop” applications.

– Matt

Updates in more than one way!

First let me start off by informing you that we’ve made a few updates to the site here:  We’ve finally modified the “about” page so that for those of you who are not familiar with our patented-technology and how we’re revolutionizing the solar industry. Make sure you check the new pages out!

Second, you should see our project launch on Kickstarter here in the next couple of days.  The presentation is currently under review by MS&T and once they’ve signed off on it funding will be a go!  Once the ball is rolling, we’ll be contacting everybody in the solar/clean industry to make sure they help us get the word out so that we can be sure to reach our goal!  Make sure you do the same, we need your help to get this technology out there!

That’s it for today, I’ll keep things short and sweet. Happy Monday!

– Matt

Time to start testing!

Hi Folks!

I am very pleased to inform you that progress is moving forward even better than we expected.  Two weeks ago we had our first meeting with the MSU Electrical Engineering team that will be designing the solar collectors for our system.  They’re all a great bunch of guys, and very smart to boot.  As they begin their research on the optimal design for creating modular collectors that can drive our engine and teams are being assembled to work on the rest of the system, we on the business side are very excited to announce that we will be launching a Kickstarter.com funding campaign VERY soon.

For those of you who have never heard of Kickstarter, let me tell you a little bit about this wonderful website.  One of the biggest problems that innovators face when trying to develop a new idea or invention is… MONEY.  The world we live in is quite an expensive place, and quite often the cost to prototype your new device, mobile application, software, etc. is a very pricey endeavor. Sadly, this prevents many technological advances from ever seeing the market place. And then, there was Kickstarter.com.

Kickstarter gives artists and innovators a place to post their projects or inventions for the purpose of raising monetary support.  They tell the story of what they’re doing, the amount of money needed to complete their venture and how exactly the money they’re asking for will be used.  After it’s posted, people who like the idea or product can then choose to “back” the project with any amount of money that they wish to contribute.  The campaigns usually last from 30-60 days and if they’ve received enough support to meet the requested funding goal, the project organizer will receive the the pledged money. IF, however, the pledged support falls short of the funding goal, the project organizer does not receive ANY of the money.  It’s an all or nothing kind of setup.

Thanks to Kickstarter, the marketplace has seen many excellent new products become available.  You can visit Kickstarter.com and browse through the archive to see if you can find any products that you recognize and take a look at the kind of projects people post there.

So in the near future, the HydroICE Solar Project will be launching a funding campaign of it’s own!  We’ll make sure to post an update here as soon as it’s live so that you can check it out and hopefully contribute.  It’s your support that will allow us to test our engine and continue or work toward making this new technology available!

– Matt

Welcome!

Every project needs an update blog, right? Right.  As we continue to make steps toward our final goal of an affordable solar system, I will personally post updates so that you can remain informed of our progress.  Make sure to check in often!  Regular progres and updates will most likely start sometime during the last two weeks of October 2012.  For those of you who are not familiar with our project, please visit the “About” page.  You can also follow us on Twitter, @HydroICE. Thanks for checking us out!

Matt